The Brain: The Story wholesale of outlet online sale You online sale

The Brain: The Story wholesale of outlet online sale You online sale

The Brain: The Story wholesale of outlet online sale You online sale

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Locked in the silence and darkness of your skull, your brain fashions the rich narratives of your reality and your identity. Join renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman for a journey into the questions at the mysterious heart of our existence. What is reality? Who are “you”? How do you make decisions? Why does your brain need other people? How is technology poised to change what it means to be human?  In the course of his investigations, Eagleman guides us through the world of extreme sports, criminal justice, facial expressions, genocide, brain surgery, gut feelings, robotics, and the search for immortality.  Strap in for a whistle-stop tour into the inner cosmos. In the infinitely dense tangle of billions of brain cells and their trillions of connections, something emerges that you might not have expected to see in there: you. 
 
This is the story of how your life shapes your brain, and how your brain shapes your life. 

 
(A companion to the six-part PBS series. Color illustrations throughout.)

Review

Nature
"An ideal introduction to how biology generates the mind.... structured around crucial and wide-ranging questions, saturated with per- sonal and social relevance. And Eagleman’s answers are consistently clear, engaging and thought-provoking."

Brian Eno

"David Eagleman''s wide-ranging roundup of the current state of knowledge about the brain is concise, accessible and often very surprising. It''s a strange new world inside your head.”

Stephen Fry
"David Eagleman’s The Brain its an astonishing read. On every page there is a revelation so fantastic as to make one gasp. It would be impossible to take in if we didn’t all possess that impossibly extraordinary thing, a brain. Eagleman comes closer than anyone to solving the mystery of how to find the self inside the grey electric mush between our ears.”

Ruby Wax
"David Eagleman makes it easy to comprehend the most complex collection of cells in the Cosmos  - our brain.   If neuroscience had a rock legend this would be him.”

About the Author

David Eagleman is a neuroscientist at Stanford University. His scientific research is published in journals from  Science to  Nature, and he is also the author of the internationally bestselling books Sum and Incognito. He is the writer and presenter of the companion BBC television series  The Brain.
 
www.eagleman.com

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction

Because brain science is a fast-moving field, it’s rare to step back to view the lay of the land, to work out what our studies mean for our lives, to discuss in a plain and simple way what it means to be a biological creature. This book sets out to do that.
 
Brain science matters. The strange computational material in our skulls is the perceptual machinery by which we navigate the world, the stuff from which decisions arise, the material from which imagination is forged. Our dreams and our waking lives emerge from its billions of zapping cells. A better understanding of the brain sheds light on what we take to be real in our personal relationships and what we take to be necessary in our social policy: how we fight, why we love, what we accept as true, how we should educate, how we can craft better social policy, and how to design our bodies for the centuries to come. In the brain’s microscopically small circuitry is etched the history and future of our species.
 
Given the brain’s centrality to our lives, I used to wonder why our society so rarely talks about it, preferring instead to fill our airwaves with celebrity gossip and reality shows. But I now think this lack of attention to the brain can be taken not as a shortcoming, but as a clue: we’re so trapped inside our reality that it is inordinately difficult to realize we’re trapped inside anything. At first blush, it seems that perhaps there’s nothing to talk about. Of course colors exist in the outside world. Of course my memory is like a video camera. Of course I know the real reasons for my beliefs.
 
The pages of this book will put all our assumptions under the spotlight. In writing it, I wanted to get away from a textbook model in favor of illuminating a deeper level of enquiry: how we decide, how we perceive reality, who we are, how our lives are steered, why we need other people, and where we’re heading as a species that’s just beginning to grab its own reins. This project attempts to bridge the gap between the academic literature and the lives we lead as brain owners. The approach I take here diverges from the academic journal articles I write, and even from my other neuroscience books. This project is meant for a different kind of audience. It doesn’t presuppose any specialized knowledge, only curiosity and an appetite for self-exploration.
 
So strap in for a whistle-stop tour into the inner cosmos. In the infinitely dense tangle of billions of brain cells and their trillions of connections, I hope you’ll be able to squint and make out something that you might not have expected to see in there. You.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
2,044 global ratings

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Book Shark
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent Companion Piece
Reviewed in the United States on March 1, 2016
The Brain: The Story of You by David Eagleman “The Brain" is an excellent companion piece to the six-part PBS series of the same title. Neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman, educates and fascinates the general public with a wonderful... See more
The Brain: The Story of You by David Eagleman

“The Brain" is an excellent companion piece to the six-part PBS series of the same title. Neuroscientist and best-selling author David Eagleman, educates and fascinates the general public with a wonderful popular-science examination of our brains. This captivating 224-page book includes the following six chapters: 1. Who am I?, 2. What is reality?, 3. Who’s in control?,4. How do I decide?, 5. Do I need you?, and 6. Who will we be?.

Positives:
1. Popular science at its best. Accessible, enlightening and fun to read.
2. The fascinating topic of neuroscience in the masterful hands of David Eagleman.
3. Full of colorful illustrations that complement the excellent narrative.
4. Eagleman’s writing style is easy on the “brain”. His goal is to educate the general public and he succeeds.
5. Full of interesting facts spruced throughout the book. “As many as two million new connections, or synapses, are formed every second in an infant’s brain. By age two, a child has over one hundred trillion synapses, double the number an adult has.”
6. A good description of the teen’s brain. “Beyond social awkwardness and emotional hypersensitivity, the teen brain is set up to take risks.”
7. Goes over some of the keys components of the brain. “The scientists were particularly interested in a small area of the brain called the hippocampus – vital for memory, and, in particular, spatial memory.”
8. Includes interesting stories. The story of Charles Whitman is quite enlightening with major repercussions on a society that values evidence.
9. Describes how memories are formed. “Our past is not a faithful record. Instead it’s a reconstruction, and sometimes it can border on mythology. When we review our life memories, we should do so with the awareness that not all the details are accurate.”
10. Describes some of the tools of a neuroscientist. “One way to measure that is with electroencephalography (EEG), which captures a summary of billions of neurons firing by picking up weak electrical signals on the outside of the skull.”
11. Considers important philosophical questions. Does the idea of an immaterial soul reconcile with neuroscientific evidence? Find out.
12. Describes reality. “One way to measure that is with electroencephalography (EEG), which captures a summary of billions of neurons firing by picking up weak electrical signals on the outside of the skull.” “Everything you experience – every sight, sound, smell – rather than being a direct experience, is an electrochemical rendition in a dark theater.” “The slice of reality that we can see is limited by our biology.”
13. Describes consciousness. “…the conscious you is only the smallest part of the activity of your brain. Your actions, your beliefs and your biases are all driven by networks in your brain to which you have no conscious access.” “I think of consciousness as the CEO of a large sprawling corporation, with many thousands of subdivisions and departments all collaborating and interacting and competing in different ways.”
14. Describes how the brain decides. “It’s easy to think about the brain commanding the body from on high – but in fact the brain is in constant feedback with the body.”
15. An interesting look at willpower. “…willpower isn’t something that we just exercise – it’s something we deplete.”
16. A look at social neuroscience. “Our social skills are deeply rooted in our neural circuitry – and understanding this circuitry is the basis of a young field of study called social neuroscience.”
17. A fascinating look at Syndrome E and its repercussions. “Syndrome E is characterized by a diminished emotional reactivity, which allows repetitive acts of violence.” “Genocide is only possible when dehumanization happens on a massive scale, and the perfect tool for this job is propaganda.”
18. A look at the future of neuroscience. “The secret to understanding our success – and our future opportunity – is the brain’s tremendous ability to adjust, known as brain plasticity.”
19. Can consciousness be uploaded? Find out.
20. A helpful glossary of terms.

Negatives:
1. As expected, a book this succinct will leave some interesting neuroscientific topics on the table. The topic of free will gets shortchanged.
2. A book intended for the general public and a companion piece no less, will lack depth.
3. The eBook edition has some glitches, as an example, extra blank pages inserted.
4. Endnotes included but no formal bibliography.

In summary, this book exemplifies my love for science. Eagleman is a master of his craft and a skilled writer. He covers complex topics on the neuroscience with ease and provides the general public with an appetizer of knowledge. Neuroscience is a fascinating field in it is infancy and Eagleman successfully whets the public’s interest. I highly recommend it!

Further recommendations: “Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain” by the same author, “How to Create a Mind” and “The Singularity is Near” by Ray Kurzwell, “Who’s in Charge?” by Michael S. Gazzaniga, “The Human Brain Book” by Rita Carter, “The Tell-Tale Brain” by V.S. Ramachandran, “Hallucinations” and “The Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat” by Oliver Sacks, “A Whole New Mind” by Daniel H. Pink, “In Search of Memory” by Eric R. Kandel, “Self Comes to Mind” by Antonio Damasio, and “The Mind” edited by John Brockman.
143 people found this helpful
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Douglas Kelly
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic Experience.
Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2016
The most fascinating book about what makes us who we are since Carl Sagan''s "Dragons of Eden". "The Brain" is not to be compared with Sagan/s book. Sagan was an astrophysicist excited about all natural things. "The Brain" is so intensely... See more
The most fascinating book about what makes us who we are since Carl Sagan''s "Dragons of Eden". "The Brain" is not to be compared with Sagan/s book. Sagan was an astrophysicist excited about all natural things. "The Brain" is so intensely interesting, more so because the author, David Eagleman is a neurophysicist, with a deep understand of the physical properties and activities of the brain, and how it works. Eagleman puts forth amazing facts about the workings of an organ most of us seldom think about. I will reread it soon, because there is so much to understand.

I would advise anyone considering reading this, that it is not a textbook. Eagleman is a very good writer. The book reads itself to you.
28 people found this helpful
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Cliente de Kindle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great
Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2019
This book is the TV series in it''s physical form, that''s why it is so illustrative both in its language so in its illustrations. I recommend its reading after Incognito (2012), the book that originated the TV series. In fact, The Brain (2015) is like a very well done... See more
This book is the TV series in it''s physical form, that''s why it is so illustrative both in its language so in its illustrations. I recommend its reading after Incognito (2012), the book that originated the TV series. In fact, The Brain (2015) is like a very well done summary of Incognito. It''s not a spin-off, it''s a reinforcement.

I''d recommend its reading together with Andrew Thomas''s Hidden in Plain Sight 9 - The Physics of Consciousness. If you want to live a full experience on what is going on inside your head, you should try all this.
11 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect for everyone interested in the brain!
Reviewed in the United States on May 1, 2020
Absolutely love this book. So I am a self taught person and haven’t even been thru college. I learn because of my own fascination with the world and the human brain. Let’s be real some informative books are plain boring or hard to focus on. I found this book to be... See more
Absolutely love this book. So I am a self taught person and haven’t even been thru college. I learn because of my own fascination with the world and the human brain. Let’s be real some informative books are plain boring or hard to focus on. I found this book to be brilliantly written so that anyone can read it and not get totally lost. Yet it has so much mind blowing (at least to me) information that caused me to really think of possibilities and sparked so much intrigue that I would have to stop ever so often and let my mind wonder on what I read. I love books that make me more apt to be hungry for more! This book does that without making you feel like you didn’t learn enough. It’s filled with a lot of knowledge and I am sad that I am almost done! 😢
4 people found this helpful
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Umut Duzerdik
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Despite these points I liked the book and it can be considered as mind ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 30, 2018
Most of the information given in this book was already in the authors previous book, however this book is precious because it contains a philosophical approach to the neuroscience and new technologies can come to life based on it. The author is a neuroscientist, that''s... See more
Most of the information given in this book was already in the authors previous book, however this book is precious because it contains a philosophical approach to the neuroscience and new technologies can come to life based on it.
The author is a neuroscientist, that''s why I believe everything written about neuroscience is true but out of his field there are wrong (at least open to argument ) data. For example "brains in vats" argument doesn''t not belong to Rene Descartes. It belongs to another philosopher Hilary Putnam. ( Descartes'' argument on the same subject was a demon making humans dream whatever he wants). The book also upset me as a Turkish reader by presenting genocide claims against Turks as historical truth.
Despite these points I liked the book and it can be considered as mind opening.
13 people found this helpful
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agarza1k
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you are curious about the brain and want to understand and marvel at its wonder, this is the book you need to read
Reviewed in the United States on January 7, 2018
It''s like reading Porth''s book on Pathophysiology of Diseases of the brain but MUCH MORE easier to chew. It''s like a really good small sugary snack compared to a huge meal with tons of protein. In other words, it''s digestible and fun to read compared to text books I am... See more
It''s like reading Porth''s book on Pathophysiology of Diseases of the brain but MUCH MORE easier to chew. It''s like a really good small sugary snack compared to a huge meal with tons of protein. In other words, it''s digestible and fun to read compared to text books I am forced to read
13 people found this helpful
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Scott - The image guy.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It all makes sense now!
Reviewed in the United States on August 24, 2016
One of the best books I''ve read in a long time. I often get bored with a book and don''t finish, but this kept my interest. Eagleman does such a great job of explaining himself that you don''t have to be a scientist to understand it. This book made so much sense and it... See more
One of the best books I''ve read in a long time. I often get bored with a book and don''t finish, but this kept my interest. Eagleman does such a great job of explaining himself that you don''t have to be a scientist to understand it. This book made so much sense and it answered those questions that you have wondered your whole life. I highlighted much of it and find myself rereading parts. I would recommend it to anyone even remotely interested in why human beings act the way they do.
24 people found this helpful
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A. Smith
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Don’t buy the Kindle edition!
Reviewed in the United States on February 3, 2020
This review is about the Kindle edition. The content of the book is great. It uses scientific results, easy-to-comprehend experiments with a simple language to make the point: Lots of unnoticed activity goes on in our heads. However the book relies heavily on colors to... See more
This review is about the Kindle edition. The content of the book is great. It uses scientific results, easy-to-comprehend experiments with a simple language to make the point: Lots of unnoticed activity goes on in our heads. However the book relies heavily on colors to illustrate the situation. And on a black and white Kindle, that information is lost. Also the formatting is sometimes messed up. Some pages are blank. Some extra text in boxes completely disrupt the flow of the book. I will order the paper version of the book. I wish Kindle editions came with a warning. Or maybe there shouldn’t be a Kindle edition in the first place. Also it would be great of Amazon allowed people to upgrade to the paperback edition by paying the price difference. Especially to people who bough a kindle book with messed up formatting. The content is 5 stars, the formatting is 1 star. Hence the average..
EDIT: Amazon kindle allowed my to return the Kindle edition beyond the 7-day return period. I have ordered the paper version.
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Top reviews from other countries

Rahul Madhavan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A whirlwind tour of psychology and neuroscience
Reviewed in India on June 17, 2017
Fast read, Must read. This is a work that draws from a lifetime of psychology and neuroscience notes. Rich in examples and experiments that one can relate to. To understand actions that we take, many of which are subconscious and even control them, we need to understand...See more
Fast read, Must read. This is a work that draws from a lifetime of psychology and neuroscience notes. Rich in examples and experiments that one can relate to. To understand actions that we take, many of which are subconscious and even control them, we need to understand whats going on beneath the hood. My favorite part of the book is in Chapter 5 where the author speaks about the psychology of war and the dehumanization that accompanies the actions that people perform within the context of a war. Being a jew himself who was affected by the WW2, he is quite passionate about this topic and it comes through from the pages. Just for this part itself it may be worth reading the book. Chapters with descriptions: 1) Who am I - Covers the basics. Brain development, what is memory 2) What is reality - The mind as a theatre - interactions between the brain darkroom and the senses 3) Who''s in Control - Subconscious vs the Conscious. What is consciousness 4) How do i decide - Effects on action by subliminal cues 5) Do i need you - Societal actions and neural explanations. How empathy is ingrained into neurons 6) Who will we be - Technology interplay with our neurons The book in general reminded me of Thinking fast and slow by Kahneman and also contains the gist of Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely.
126 people found this helpful
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Robert Macdonald
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A good summary of the TV Series.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 13, 2016
This is really a very good book. Clear and brimming with enthusiasm and genuine knowledge, for anyone who isn''t up to date with brain science this book will be a revelation. Modern brain scanning techniques provide evidence for where there was previously only speculation,...See more
This is really a very good book. Clear and brimming with enthusiasm and genuine knowledge, for anyone who isn''t up to date with brain science this book will be a revelation. Modern brain scanning techniques provide evidence for where there was previously only speculation, and as is so often the case, the truth is stranger, more uplifting, more revealing and more amazing than fiction or guesswork. Eagleman tells it well. So 4/5 may seem a bit unfair but... It used to be that if you watched a fascinating TV series, the book of the series treated you to more detail that can be easily covered on-screen. This is no longer the case and ''The Brain'' seems more a summary of than companion to the TV series. So if you''ve seen the series the book won''t tell you more - although it does revisit and re-enforce much that is good. Secondly, I''ve also read Incognito, which is a more immersive read, does contain more detail and pulls off that trick of making you feel that you (rather than the author) is the smart one. For all that, ''The Brain'' will leave you desperate for more - a rare compliment for a modern book.
34 people found this helpful
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Von Clausewicz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Compulsory reading for all brain-owners
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 20, 2016
This is an excellent book of interest to everyone who has a brain. It is the book of the TV series and follows it pretty closely although the TV series was also excellent. Of particular interest to everyone, especially now, is chapter 5 (Episode 5) where Eagleman reprises...See more
This is an excellent book of interest to everyone who has a brain. It is the book of the TV series and follows it pretty closely although the TV series was also excellent. Of particular interest to everyone, especially now, is chapter 5 (Episode 5) where Eagleman reprises one of those seminal experiments which gives deep insight into our behaviour. In essence he exposes the core mechanism which leads to the collapse of empathy and the beginning of fascistic thinking. If the lessons of that chapter were widely understood our behaviour to each other would be moderated quite differently. Certainly compulsory reading for all politicians and would-be politicians for a start. The book (and series) also gives insights this reader was only generally aware of, and had never seen written down, about how fragile our perception of our surroundings actually is. We build models in our heads and only update it with the deltas our senses sense. But if we somehow interfere with the model in other ways then entirely hallucinatory effects can be produced. As Eagleman points out our perception of colour is quite arbitrary. Reality isn''t necessarily like that and its all a matter of how you interpret what your senses give you. We are ca walking mass of illusions about ourselves. What we sense and what we are, are two different things altogether. Likewise what we perceive and what is. A salutary lesson, in fact six or more salutary lessons, for all owners.
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Jamie’s Reviews
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brilliant book by David Eagleman. Highly recommend it
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 2, 2020
This book is written in a fun and informative way about how the human brain works and why we do the things we do. It touches many aspects around the brain. Anyone with a slight interest in psychology or psychiatry might find this book highly interesting. It is not a...See more
This book is written in a fun and informative way about how the human brain works and why we do the things we do. It touches many aspects around the brain. Anyone with a slight interest in psychology or psychiatry might find this book highly interesting. It is not a textbook format. Easy to read book.
4 people found this helpful
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alienfunk
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
perfect for those new to the brain
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 8, 2016
I am very new to the brain but I''m exploring the concept of memory so this book was ideal to learn the basics in how the brain functions. It is an easy book to understand and holds your attention. If you are like me and find the use of academic text difficult to retain then...See more
I am very new to the brain but I''m exploring the concept of memory so this book was ideal to learn the basics in how the brain functions. It is an easy book to understand and holds your attention. If you are like me and find the use of academic text difficult to retain then this is the book for you.
16 people found this helpful
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