Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

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The enthralling, previously untold story of the friendships and forces that shaped the Kennedy presidency.

In the summer of 1938 a tall, raw-boned Harvard student arrived in London, where his father was the American ambassador and his favorite sister, Kick, had gained entrée to a closed group of young aristocrats. In the run-up to World War II, as Winston Churchill called on a reluctant Britain to resist Adolf Hitler before it was too late, Jack Kennedy formed bonds of friendship and family that would forever change his life and the course of American history.

Drawing on many new primary sources, this book is the first to trace the dramatic arc of Kennedy''s intellectual and political formation, and to detail the goals of his presidency as he saw them. For the first time we get an intimate picture of a leader torn between politics and principle, a president wrestling with private demons and unresolved conflicts dating back to the 1930s, when Churchill and Ambassador Joseph Kennedy were adversaries on the public stage. 24 pages of photographs.

From Publishers Weekly

Hollywood chronicler Leaming ( Orson Welles; Katharine Hepburn) overreaches and overstates in her first attempt at political biography. Leaming endeavors to show how JFK''s WWII-era relationships with British aristocrats (such as his doomed brother-in-law, Billy Hartington, heir to the duke of Devonshire), together with extensive readings in British political history and an idealization of Churchill, formed the mature Kennedy''s brinkmanship approach to the Cold War. Leaming fails to point out that President Kennedy''s modus operandi with regard to the Soviets followed precedent established by Truman and Eisenhower, and that JFK was often a junior partner in policies articulated by such NATO leaders as British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan—all of them, of course, influenced to some extent by Churchill, who had first articulated the concept of an iron curtain. That Kennedy idealized and romanticized the British aristocracy is true. That this idealization had a great impact on his presidential philosophy regarding foreign policy is somewhat less so. In fact, America''s longstanding cultural, emotional and ethical alliance with Britain, and the need to play hardball in the face of early 1960s Soviet aggression, would have gone a long way toward defining JFK''s tactics in international relations even had he not visited England as a young man. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Convincingly shows how Churchill and the British came to play a major role in JFK''s intellectual and political outlook…Highly recommended. -- Library Journal

Intriguing revisionist biography…Leaming is excellent at interweaving Kennedy''s psychological and intellectual development…A brave thesis, presented with forensic skill…Persuasively argued. -- Daily Telegraph [London]

Leaming has added a new dimension to the life of Kennedy, and she has done a great service…Extraordinary. -- Liz Smith, New York Post

Thoroughly well written and constructed, with fresh views on the Kennedy presidency and the difficult path that led to Camelot. -- Kirkus Reviews

Toweringly talented biographer tackles the friskiest figure of the 20th century. -- Tatler [London]

About the Author

Author of the critically acclaimed Orson Welles and the New York Times bestseller Katharine Hepburn, Barbara Leaming has also written for Vanity Fair and the New York Times Magazine. She lives in New Milford, Connecticut.

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4.3 out of 54.3 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Thomas J. Farrell
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
JFK as Emerging Statesman
Reviewed in the United States on December 25, 2009
Barbara Leaming''s well-written 2006 book JACK KENNEDY: THE EDUCATION OF A STATESMAN deepens our understanding of JFK''s relationships within his family, of his relationship with his long-time friend David Ormsby Gore, and of JFK''s intellectual development -- which is what... See more
Barbara Leaming''s well-written 2006 book JACK KENNEDY: THE EDUCATION OF A STATESMAN deepens our understanding of JFK''s relationships within his family, of his relationship with his long-time friend David Ormsby Gore, and of JFK''s intellectual development -- which is what Leaming means by the education of a statesman.

Leaming holds a Ph.D. from NYU. Her 1976 doctoral dissertation was a study of the transition to socialist realism in the Soviet cinema of the 1930s. As an undergraduate at Smith College, her field of specialization was Russian studies. She has published biographies about Grigori Kozintsev (1980), Roman Polanski (1981), Rita Hayworth (1989), Orson Welles (1995), Bette Davis (1992), Katharine Hepburn (1995), Marilyn Monroe (1998), and Jacqueline Kennedy (2001).

In the process of detailing JFK''s purported education as a statesman, Leaming focuses on how important lively conversation, including lively political conversation, was in JFK''s life. In my judgment, this is the major strength of her book - the lively quality of JFK''s mind as he engaged in spirited political conversation.

In approximately the first half of her 2006 book, Leaming details the life and death of Kathleen ("Kick") Kennedy (born 1920), JFK''s younger sister who was very fond of him and supportive of him within the family where their father overtly favored his elder son Joe Jr. (born 1915; died in war on August 12, 1944). After Kick''s death in a plane crash in 1948, her mother stated that she had been her father''s favorite child.

When Joe Sr. (born 1888) served as ambassador to England (starting in 1938), his daughter Kick turned 18. In short order, she became a superstar among a certain set of young British aristocrats, eventually marrying one of them on May 6, 1944, Billy Hartington (born 1917; died in war on September 10, 1944).

When her favorite older brother Jack (born 1917) eventually joined the family in England later in 1938, he was welcomed into Kick''s circle of aristocratic friends and became one of the group of young people who gloried in talking with one another. From an early age, the Kennedy children had learned to engage in spirited table talk with their verbally combative father. For their part, Kick and Jack so enjoyed talking with one another that certain people described them as being almost like twins. For his part, Jack had started reading books by Winston Churchill when he was a teenager, so he fell in naturally with the political talk among the young British aristocrats in Kick''s set of friends, one of whom was David Ormsby Gore (born 1918), himself a second son overshadowed by his older brother just as Jack was overshadowed in his father''s eyes by his older brother Joe Jr.

Later, when his friend Jack Kennedy was the president, David Ormsby Gore was appointed the British ambassador to the United States. In the latter half of her book, Leaming centers her attention on the frequent conversations between Jack and David, and on the important conversations between President Kennedy and British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan. Churchill''s thought and example formed the conceptual framework for those spirited conversations about the demands of the politician versus the duty of the statesman.

Prime Minister Macmillan eventually prevailed on President Kennedy to play the role of the statesman and advance the test ban treaty with Nikita Khrushchev and the Soviet Union, which the U.S. Senate approved by a vote of 80-19 on September 24, 1963. Kennedy signed the instruments of ratification on October 7, 1963. In accord with the subtitle of her book, this is the culminating event discussed by Leaming because at long last Kennedy had acted like a statesman. But she does have a brief epilogue about a commemorative event in England in 1965.

As chance would have it, I did not read Leaming''s 2006 book about JFK until after I had read James W. Douglass'' fine book JFK AND THE UNSPEAKABLE: WHY HE DIED AND WHY IT MATTERS (Orbis Books, 2008). Even though Douglass cites an impressive number of books about JFK, he does not happen to cite Leaming''s book.

But the lively quality of JFK''s political conversations that Leaming details goes a long way to explain the emerging independence of mind that Douglass praises Kennedy for in five different ways that he discusses in detail: (1) the October 1962 Cuban missile crisis, (2) JFK''s June 1963 American University address, (3) the 1963 test ban treaty, mentioned above, (4) the beginning of a back-channel dialogue with Fidel Castro, and (5) JFK''s order to withdraw troops from Vietnam (an order that was not carried out). Those five things do indeed represent a gradual turning toward peace on JFK''s part, as Douglass claims.

Douglass himself sees those five things, following the debacle of the April 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, as five further ways that JFK frustrated his more militant military advisers - in short, five further ways he was a traitor to the Cold War cause as they understood it.

But as Leaming shows, JFK had devoted considerable time over the years to turning over and over different possible options in spirited political conversation. In other words, his eventual turning toward peace in the five ways that Douglass praises did not come out of the blue as it were, but out of years of practice in turning over and over different options in spirited political conversation.

Moreover, in addition to the 1963 test ban treaty, which Leaming also discusses at length, the other four things that Douglass praises JFK for could arguably be seen as further examples of what Leaming means by a statesman, as distinct from a mere politician.
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Sluefoot
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good but not great
Reviewed in the United States on March 29, 2009
This book gets 6 stars out of 10. I had difficulty getting through this otherwise interesting book. She makes the case for President Kennedy''s foreign policy being heavily influenced by and derived from the speeches and writings of Winston Churchill and the personal... See more
This book gets 6 stars out of 10. I had difficulty getting through this otherwise interesting book. She makes the case for President Kennedy''s foreign policy being heavily influenced by and derived from the speeches and writings of Winston Churchill and the personal influence of Prime Minister Harold Macmillan and Kennedy''s close friend, David Ormsby Gore.

It was a bit irritating that almost the entire first 1/3 of the book seemed devoted to Kennedy''s sister, Kathleen, who was killed in a plane crash in 1948.

There are several mentions of Kennedy''s sexual proclivity as well as his drug use to keep him at peak performance. It was surprising to me that he apparently had difficulty focusing on more than one thing at a time.

One real irritant was the author''s propensity of referring to everyone by their nicknames as if she knew them intimately. Kennedy was always Jack, his brother was Bobby, his deceased brother and father were Joe, and most disconcerting was that Kathleen was called ''Kick'' so many times that I had trouble recalling her real name. I was expecting Ms. Leaming next to refer to PM Macmillan as ''Harry'' bur she showed more deference to the British.

There is interesting detail about the give and take between Kennedy and Khrushchev (Thank goodness she didn''t call him ''Nikky'') while the former engages in strong attempts to make the world safer from nuclear destruction and how the British played an important role.

Worth a read if you don''t have something better to do.
3 people found this helpful
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Mom to Many Boys
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent buy...
Reviewed in the United States on July 17, 2021
This book is in perfect condition and sports a library jacket, too! Great bargain - highly recommend the seller.
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Anglophile
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Summer Read
Reviewed in the United States on July 10, 2007
You''ll find Barbara Leaming''s marvelous book very difficult to put down. Somehow she has uncovered entirely new source material which sheds light on Kennedy''s early years in Great Britain when his father Joe was Ambassador to the Court of St. James. Introduced by his sister... See more
You''ll find Barbara Leaming''s marvelous book very difficult to put down. Somehow she has uncovered entirely new source material which sheds light on Kennedy''s early years in Great Britain when his father Joe was Ambassador to the Court of St. James. Introduced by his sister Kick to a circle of bright young aristocrats, the connections made in these early years would last a lifetime and shape his world view in a dangerous time for the US and for the world. What struck me particularly in the book was how much of what Kennedy learns is still enormously relevant in today''s world. This book should be required reading for our leaders in Washington and especially our Presidential candidates for 2008! I cannot wait to see what subject Ms. Leaming takes on next.
5 people found this helpful
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Fran McGaughey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on April 15, 2018
I enjoy reading about the Kennedys.
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Beverly
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
jack kennedy: the education of a statesman
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2007
everything about this transaction was first class.
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An Amazon Lover
4.0 out of 5 stars
A different take on Kennedy
Reviewed in the United States on July 10, 2006
I have read practically every book written about John F. Kennedy, having grown up in a family who had a picture of the President on our fireplace mantle. This was a side of Kennedy I have not read about. Although I''m still not sure the impact of his "British" education... See more
I have read practically every book written about John F. Kennedy, having grown up in a family who had a picture of the President on our fireplace mantle. This was a side of Kennedy I have not read about. Although I''m still not sure the impact of his "British" education affected his decisions in the manner Leaming described, it puts another "face" to the man whose short presidency made such an impact on the cold war.
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Sifaria
4.0 out of 5 stars
A New Look At Jack Kennedy
Reviewed in the United States on August 16, 2006
A child when Kennedy was assassinated, I grew up with a mix of fact and mystique in what I knew of President Kennedy. Barbara Leaming''s book introduces me to a Kennedy not unrecognizable from the Kennedy I was aware of growing up, without whitewashing his actions.... See more
A child when Kennedy was assassinated, I grew up with a mix of fact and mystique in what I knew of President Kennedy. Barbara Leaming''s book introduces me to a Kennedy not unrecognizable from the Kennedy I was aware of growing up, without whitewashing his actions.

I really enjoy the way she brings across Jack Kennedy in the various points of his life. It does seem to dwell a little overlong on his sister Kick''s story, but it''s a really satisfying read and she really brings historical moments of the time to life and shows them in relation to Kennedy''s life.
5 people found this helpful
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Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale

Jack Kennedy: lowest The sale Education of a Statesman online sale